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GLD Inaugural Conference: 'Mapping Local Governance'

The conference aimed to reconsider the state-oriented, center-focused approach to governance in the Middle East and North Africa in an attempt to improve both policymaking and scholarship. The conference gathered policymakers and scholars to reconsider the variation in local governance, both within and across countries in the Arab world.
 
For scholars, the interdisciplinary conference aimed to advance new theoretical and empirical understandings of state and non-state interactions, defining research and design solutions that assume a central place for local governance in the Middle East and North Africa.
 
For policymakers, it aimed to consider relevant tools for mapping local governance, and to examine the implications of such variation on policy implementation and outcomes.
 
To know more about the Programm check their new website at: http://gld.commons.yale.edu

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Yale University, May 1-2, 2014
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<p>The Program on Governance and Local Development co-sponsored by the MHF has held its inaugural conference 'Mapping Local Governance' on May 1st and 2nd at Yale University.The conference gathered policymakers and scholars to reconsider the variation in local governance, both within and across countries in the Arab world</p>
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Intellectuals and Historical Transformations in the Arab world

The events that occurred during the winter of 2011 surprised and destabilized Arab intellectuals. The large majority of the latter did not foresee the changes and even theorized a lack of change, convinced that the long-standing regimes were set to stay.
 
In order to understand and analyze this unsynchronized attitude, the role and status of intellectuals within authoritarian regimes should be examined, as well as the complex inter-relations between the intelligentsia and power -a political relationship strictly linked to the evolution of contemporary Arab societies and cultures (19th-20th centuries), influenced by reformism and torn between “Oriental” and “Western” political imaginaries.
 
The meeting, due to be held on 17 and 18 May 2014 at the Hotel Mövenpick Gammarth in Tunisia, does not aim at establishing an academic update of the situation, but rather at rethinking the itinerary of Arab intellectuals through an historical perspective, in order to understand their discourse and positions within a fast changing intellectual and political space. The study will therefore question the interweaving of the intellectual and political spheres in so far as intellectuals are both producers of sense and aspire to play a political role meant to change society and culture.
 
The reflection, which will mainly deal with the relationship of Arab intellectuals with politics, will focus on four axes or panels:
• Arab intellectuals in history;
• Arab intellectuals, Islam and otherness;
• Youth, new media and social networks;
• A final round table on Arab intellectuals and political power.
 
 
Organised by the Moulay Hicham Foundation, the Conference is convened by Khadija Mohsen-Finan and Mohamed Kerrou.

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Tunis, 17 et 18 mai 2014
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<p>The Moulay Hicham Foundation organizes in Tunis on the 17th and 18th of May 2014 a Conference on Intellectuals and historical transformations in the Arab world.</p>
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Lina Khatib

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<p>Lina Khatib is director of the Carnegie Middle East Center in Beirut. Previously, she was the co-founding head of the Program on Arab Reform and Democracy at Stanford University’s Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Her research interests include the international relations of the Middle East, Islamist groups, political transitions, and foreign policy. She has also published widely on public diplomacy, political communication, and political participation in the Middle East.</p> <p>Khatib has published seven books, including:</p> <p><em>Image Politics in the Middle East: The Role of the Visual in Political Struggle</em> (I. B. Tauris, 2013) and the forthcoming</p> <p><em>Taking to the Streets: The Transformation of Arab Activism</em> (co-edited with Ellen Lust, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014).</p> <p>Her published journal articles include “Qatar’s Foreign Policy: The Limits of Pragmatism,” “Public Diplomacy 2.0,” and “Hizbullah’s Political Strategy.”</p> <p>Since 2008, Khatib has been a founding co-editor of the Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication and a research associate at the University of London’s School of Oriental and African Studies. From 2010 to 2012, she was a nonresident research fellow at the University of Southern California’s Center on Public Diplomacy. She lectured at the University of London from 2003 to 2010.</p>
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Prince Moulay Hicham's Key Note Speech at Harvard Law School

The Harvard Arab Alumni Association, the various MENA clubs across campus, and the Arab student body have organizing the seventh Harvard Arab Weekend (HAW), that took place at Harvard University from the 7 – 10 of November, 2013.
 
As the largest pan-Arab conference in North America, the Harvard Arab Weekend has prided itself on showcasing a mosaic of perspectives and insights on the most pressing issues in the Arab world. We come from a region whose direction is driven by a strong sense of urgency, and rightly so.
 
A quick look at the past century brings about a multitude of events that had repercussions going beyond the geographic confines of the Arab world: fall of the Ottoman empire, emergence of nation-states, colonization of Arab countries, the Nakba, rise of liberation movements, golden age of pan-Arabism, military dictatorships, Arab-Israeli wars, oil crises, emergence of contemporary political Islam, Iraq-Iran war, first Gulf War, second Gulf War, and the still ongoing Arab uprisings.
The prevalence of a geopolitical component linking together all of the above led to the emergence of a narrative reflecting political, military, and security concerns. Although this narrative captures an essential part of our contemporary history, we strongly believe that a complementary story is waiting to unfold. Indeed, the common narrative has often pictured the political and socio-economic woes as an inexorable reality for the Arab world. We then find ourselves confined in a self-reinforcing cycle of sufferings and resilient issues that seem unavoidable, if only because they have been here with us all the time.
 
We would like to take the opportunity offered to us through the Harvard Arab Weekend in order to identify the contours of these realities and push ourselves to look for solutions instead of letting despair and complacency reign in our assessment and reflection. Specifically, we would like to draw on the energy of Arab students and professionals to unveil this alternative narrative, which we have anchored around three broad categories: Cherish, Challenge, and Change.
 
CHERISH is an invitation to celebrate what we love about the Arab world, whether it is Palestine, heritage, arts, women, culture, or the incredible achievements that many of our citizens have accomplished. Central to this category is the sense of pride that we relate to our identity as Arabs.
 
CHALLENGE is the act of questioning, confronting, and addressing the hard truths that seldom appear on the surface. It includes topics such as poverty, transparency, human rights, civic engagement, and, most importantly, discussing what it means to be Arab in a globalized world.
 
CHANGE starts from a sense of individual effort and collective exertion combined with an awareness of the difficult work ahead. It starts with a definition of genuine regional priorities and is an invitation to contribute, rise above, engage, and become a better citizen of the Arab world.
 
For more infos: http://harvardarabweekend.org/

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<p style="text-align: justify;">Prince Moulay Hicham has participated in '7th Harvard Arab Weekend' as a key note speaker. Organised by the Harvard Arab Alumni Association, the various MENA clubs across campus, and the Arab student body have organizing the seventh Harvard Arab Weekend (HAW), it took place at Harvard University from the 7 – 10 of November, 2013.</p> <div></div>
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Arab Spring II: Geopolitics strikes back

The third edition of the annual conference organised by the Chaire d'Histoire du Monde arabe contemporain du Collège de France, the Moulay Hicham Foundation and the Fondation Hugot of the Collège de France is dedicated to the geopolitics in the Middle East and North Africa after the Arab revolutions.
To download the full programme (in French): Click here
 
 

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Paris, Fondation Hugot, 24 and 25th of June 2013
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<p>The third edition of the annual conference organised by the Chaire d'Histoire du Monde arabe contemporain du Collège de France, the Moulay Hicham Foundation and the Fondation Hugot of the Collège de France is dedicated to the geopolitics in the Middle East and North Africa after the Arab revolutions.</p> <div></div> <p> </p>
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From Street Mobilization to Political Mobilization

 
CONFERENCE PAPERS

- Henry Laurens: 'The Arab revolutions and their mobilization in the light of the region history'
 
- Jillian Schwedler: 'The Spatial Dynamics of the Arab Uprisings'
 
- Laurent Bonnefoy: 'The Yemeni revolutionnary process: Have the 'shabab al-thawra' lost in the face of institutionalized politics?'
 
-Stéphane Lacroix: 'Can Salafis be political actors like all others? The transformations of the Salafi movement in Egypt'
 
-Mert Arslanalp and Wendy Pearlman: 'Popular mobilization and military-controlled transitions to democracy. Insight from Brazil and Turkey, lessons for Egypt'
 

-Michael Herb: 'Monarchs, parliaments, and protesters in the Arab Spring'
 
 

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September 1-2, 2012- Skhirat, Morocco
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<p>From 'Street Mobilization to Political Mobilization' took place in Skhirat, Morocco, on the 1st and 2nd of September 2012. It was organised by the Moulay Hicham Foundation as a closed retreat. You can download here the papers presented to the Conference.</p>
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<p>Henry LAURENS (Collège de France);</p> <p>Olivier ROY (European University Institute);</p> <p>Sean YOM (Temple University);</p> <p>Richard FALK (Santa Barbara University);</p> <p>Fahrad KHOSROKHAVAR (EHESS Paris);</p> <p>Jillian SCHWEDLER (University of Massachusetts);</p> <p>Laurent BONNEFOY (CNRS);</p> <p>Mohammed HACHEMAOUI (Université d’Alger);</p> <p>Stéphane LACROIX (IEP - Paris);</p> <p>Wendy PEARLMAN (Northwestern University);</p> <p>Thomas PIERRET (University of Edinburgh);</p> <p>Bernard HAYKEL (Princeton University);</p> <p>Michael HERB (Georgia State University);</p> <p>Marwan KARDOOSH (Editor in Chief, Jordan Business Magazine)</p>
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The Other Morocco

An article by Moulay Hicham in the French publication 'Pouvoirs'
Morocco five years from now, in the aftermath of the “Cumin Revolution” : through such a projection and without any recourse to political fiction,the article draws an a posteriori balance sheet of the current stalemate by looking at the solutions proposed. Such a reversal of perspective makes it possible to raise old questions, left unanswered, in a new form. In this light, the “new Morocco” seems like a pipe dream, the confinement of the country into a waiting room following the current wait-and-see policy, a real utopia. Yet, the other Morocco – a country where life would be easy and pleasant – is within reach.

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In the Press
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Congratulations Letter of Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton Letter for 'A Whisper to a Roar'
 
 
'The film is not only a riveting documentary, but also offers inspiration to people everywhere who seek to make governments accountable to the citizens they serve. The stories in “A Whisper to a Roar” demonstrate that democracy is a product of tremendous sacrifice, and we are all responsible for securing its promise for future generations.' - Hillary Rodham Clinton

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<p>'The film is not only a riveting documentary, but also offers inspiration to people everywhere who seek to make governments accountable to the citizens they serve (...)</p>
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The Movie

This documentary began as an idea on the part of writer/producer/director Ben Moses to bring the incredible work of democracy advocate and expert Larry Diamond into the public eye. Moses was deeply impressed with Diamond’s moving book, “The Spirit of Democracy,” and sought a way to dramatize the ideas it and Diamond’s other work presented. Diamond was supportive of the idea, and introduced Moses to his former student and distinguished democracy advocate in his own right, Prince Moulay Hicham ben Abdallah of Morroco. Together, the three decided to launch a documentary film project. Moses and his production company, Appleseed Entertainment would develop the film, Larry Diamond would serve as Executive Producer and head advisor and Moulay Hicham provided development funding and participate in any way he could best support the project. In the summer of 2008, Diamond invited Moses to attend Stanford’s Center for Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law’s annual Draper Hills Summer Fellowship on Democracy and Development Program, where democracy activists around the world gather to received training and support for their work. There, Moses was able to meet and film brief interviews with many fascinating activists. This footage was soon edited into a promotional video to help raise funds for the full-length documentary. However, the economic crisis that arose in 2008 made fundraising difficult, and ultimately Moulay Hicham committed to making sure the important work of the film went on, with or without outside funding. With financing secured by the Prince, filming began at the 2009 Draper Hills summer program. Producer Amy Martinez and Line Producer Christopher Pavlick were hired in early 2010, and Lynne Moses, Moses’ partner in Appleseed Entertainment, joined the team as an Executive Producer. Under Diamond’s guidance, five countries were chosen as the primary subjects of the film: Egypt, Malaysia, Ukraine, Venezuela and Zimbabwe. Given that the target audience included many people in non-Western countries, it was determined that the message would be best received if the exploration of democracy did not include the U.S. or other Western democracies. The core message of the work is that the thirst for freedom and accountable government is universal and that democracy is not just a Western concept. If your vote counts, make it count. If not, help make it happen. Another factor that went into the country selection was the desire to focus on activists in various stages of the process: The Student Organizer – Roberto Patiño of Venezuela; The Protest Organizers – Esraa Ahmed Fattah and Ahmed Maher of Egypt; The Jailed Dissident cum Opposition Candidate – Anwar Ibrahim of Malaysia; The Elected, but Thwarted, Challenger – Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai in Zimbabwe; and the Victorious Opposition Leader – Former President Viktor Yushchenko of Ukraine. Along the way, it was determined that Moulay Hicham himself should interview the various heads of state interviewed for the film, when possible. As a result, the filmmakers have a treasure trove of interviews conducted by the Prince, some of which have been included in the documentary. As time did not allow for full exploitation of this rich material, a separate project is being developed around those interviews. After the filmmakers “last” filming trip in November 2010, where they covered the rigged parliamentary elections in Egypt, editing began in earnest – and the Arab Spring broke out. A return trip to Egypt in April 2011 was scheduled, as well as a return to Malaysia to interview former Prime Minister Mahthir Mohamad. Editing proved to be an enormous undertaking, whittling down enormous amounts of fantastic material on five countries into one, 94 minute film. The Herculean task was finally completed in July 2012.

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<p>This documentary began as an idea on the part of writer/producer/director Ben Moses to bring the incredible work of democracy advocate and expert Larry Diamond into the public eye. Moses was deeply impressed with Diamond’s moving book, “The Spirit of Democracy,” and sought a way to dramatize the ideas it and Diamond’s other work presented.</p>
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Act II - Arab Spring, Are the Arab monarchies next?

As the chaotic transition towards democracy continues in North Africa and Yemen, the fighting in Syria is intensifying. And, less noticed, opposition to the Arab monarchies is growing.
 
 
To read the full English version of the article visit: http://mondediplo.com/2013/01/02arab
 
To download the PDF version, clik here.

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By Moulay Hicham - Le Monde Diplomatique - January 2013
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<p>As the chaotic transition towards democracy continues in North Africa and Yemen, the fighting in Syria is intensifying. And, less noticed, opposition to the Arab monarchies is growing.</p>
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